just.me updates

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Facebook Home Design Process

TechCrunch writer Josh Constine published a wonderful article and accompanying video about the Facebook Home design process.

The reason it is so good is that it really goes to the heart of what a social smartphone needs to be thinking about.

Of course this is a problem close to my heart, and just.me as a project is addressing many of the same fundamental issues.

The key is to understand that to personalize the smartphone the address book, and the interactions with people in it, are the center of a persons real life. These interactions should also be at the center of their smartphones UI. Today this isn’t the case with either iOS or Android. As Facebook says, they are app centric. Google Now and Googles Notification Center are both promising points of integration for a very different experience. So too is Apples “Today” screen in iOS7. It is likely that the future mobile OS will look more like Home than it does like today’s UI’s. It is unlikely that Facebook will own that experience however. Owning an OS is a pre-condition.

The Video is here, for the article go to TechCrunch – http://techcrunch.com/2013/07/20/facebook-home-design/

Realtime Twitter responses to my TechCrunch article

I wrote a piece for TechCrunch over the weekend. It has been quite well received.

http://techcrunch.com/2013/05/18/the-future-of-mobile-social-could-spell-the-end-for-social-networks/

Here is the real time feedback from Twitter:


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just.me beta and European Interviews.

I was in Europe last week, at the DLD conference in Munich and then in London.

just.me went into beta on 21st January and I was able to do 2 interviews:

The Guardian Podcast

and

An Interview with xube.tv

The beta launch coverage has been wonderful….

http://techcrunch.com/2013/01/23/741025just-me-ios-beta/

http://allthingsd.com/20130123/just-me-app-wants-tobe-a-switchboard-operator-for-all-your-messaging-needs/

http://pandodaily.com/2013/01/23/just-me-launches-in-beta-is-this-what-facebook-would-have-looked-like-if-it-were-built-for-mobile/

http://blog.evernote.com/opportunitynotes/2013/01/23/just-me-holds-these-names-to-be-self-evident/

http://thenextweb.com/apps/2013/01/25/just-me-iphone-beta-launch/

If you have iOS6 and want to try the beta, DM me on Twitter – @kteare

The impact of mobile growth on web advertising. Is Android bad for Google?

alternate textGoogle and Facebook can’t turn off the mobile deluge

I just posted on TechCrunch. The article focuses on the Facebook S1 filing and in particular on the risks section that covers the growth of the mobile internet and its potential impact on the web business model.

Facebook itself has been very clear that its advertising revenues are exclusively derived from its web site, and also that an increasing amount of its usage comes from mobile in general and smart phones in particular.

Buried in the article is this point:

Google’s present – and Facebook’s future – involves the painful fact that the very success of mobile platforms in helping human beings be productive, on the go, has a negative impact on the desktop-based advertising programs of the past 10 years. Mobile growth impacts web advertising revenues, except of course for Apple who make money from hardware and software and so benefits from these trends. The reason is simple. We do less ad-centric activities on mobile than we did on the web. And we are less likely to click away on an ad when we are focused on a specific goal on a largely single window device.

The implication of this point is that, absent an advertising solution for mobile, Google’s success in distributing Android, as well as the rise of the iPhone, are directly damaging to Google’s legacy business model. Now, it isn’t as if anybody can turn the mobile internet off or slow its growth. So Google has no option but to be a significant player in mobile, and has no option but to try and drive the revenues it derives from mobile harder than the pace of slow down in web based revenues that result from the trend. But to accomplish that Google, and Facebook will need to innovate in advertising. Web based display ads, text ads and others are really not able to translate effectively to mobile without seriusly undermining the user experience.

This is one of the areas we are focused on at just.me.

Cloud based services – the future of the Internet

Fred Wilson has a response today to Eric Schmidt’s declaration in Edinburgh that Google+ is an “identity service”. He asks and answers his own question.

“whom Google built this service for? You or them. And the answer to why you need to use your real name in the service is because they need you to.”

Of course Facebook is also an identity service. Facebook Connect is the means of distributing it. And of course Facebook too is built using real names because “they need you to”.

At this level FaceBook and Google have much in common, and both are vying for us to use them for online authentication. Facebook is far ahead of course.

Late yesterday I posted an opinion piece as a guest author on TechCrunch. It is about the uncertain future of web services as mobile devices proliferate globally. We will soon all have awesome identity machines in our pocket. They will be capable of being used to authenticate us (even using 2 step authentication). Any cloud-based 3rd party identity system will be unnecessary.

The future of identity is distributed, under user control, and owned and managed by the user from their device. It will be capable of supporting anonymity and real names and will be able to be trusted by sites requiring you to authenticate. The idea of any 3rd party dictating how you can present yourself online will no longer be applicable. Of course, it still has to be built…..

Having said that, there is absolutely nothing wrong with Google and/or Facebook building an identity system that dictates how we present ourselves. Our choice is to use it or not…..We don’t have to.